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Human Rights Reports


Written by Alrassed Alliby Editor
7 Agu 2013 9:32 am
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The International amnesty warns of the use of the judiciary as a tool for revenge after the death sentence on the politician Ahmed Ibrahim.

The International amnesty warns of the use of the judiciary as a tool for revenge after the death sentence on the politician Ahmed Ibrahim.

The International amnesty has warned the Libyan authorities of how danger is using the judiciary as a tool of "revenge" after the sentence of death on a former minister in the regime of Muammar Gaddafi. She said in a report released that "thousands of prisoners detained in the context of a dispute 2011, including former soldiers and supporters of Colonel Muammar Gaddafi, may be convicted of a similar penalty"

It’s worth mentioning that the Court of discrimination in Misrata, sentenced Wednesday Ahmed Ibrahim the former minister with five other people to death on charges of acting against state security during the conflict in 2011
Ahmed Ibrahim held several positions of responsibility in the former regime, including the Minister of Education in the eighties and head deputy of the General People's Congress. And was one of the officials in the Revolutionary Committees.

Philip Luther, director of the Middle East and North Africa in the organization defending human rights, said “The victims of war crimes and violations of human rights have the right treat them well by realization justice, justice that is not based on revenge." He said, "That the trial of former Gaddafi loyalists constitutes a test of the judicial system in Libya.

 The International amnesty also added that "there is a real concern that could indicate a movement towards the resumption of executions", a memorandum issued several provisions of the death penalty since the end of the armed conflict that ousted Gaddafi in 2011. Luther called "the necessity to freeze the implementation of the death penalty immediately as a first step towards abolition."

The organization also expressed "great concern that still exists in terms of a fair trial in Libya because of the fragile security situation," and "dangers" posed by "state institutions, courts, lawyers, judges and prosecutors."